Book Club: The YES Brain
Jan
31
8:30 AM08:30

Book Club: The YES Brain

8:30 AM - 9:30 AM | Book Club with the Peter Clark Center for Mind, Brain, and Education Kicks off 2019 with a discussion of the book: The Yes Brain: How to Cultivate Courage, Curiosity, and Resilience in Your Child  with fellow Breck parents and Dr. Daisy Pellant, Director of the PCC! The Whole Brain Child explains the new science of how a child’s brain is wired and how it matures. If you are worried about finding time between now and January 31 to read it, don’t. If you can “skim” it, you can join the discussion!

If you are interested in participating or have questions, please contact Stacy Best at Stacy.Best@mac.com or 612-384-8082.


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Dr. Sara Lazar - How Mindfulness & Yoga Change the Brain for the Better
Nov
29
7:00 PM19:00

Dr. Sara Lazar - How Mindfulness & Yoga Change the Brain for the Better

  • Upper School Library - Breck School (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Sara W. Lazar, PhD is an Associate Researcher in the Psychiatry Department at Massachusetts General Hospital and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Harvard Medical School. The focus of her research is to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of yoga and meditation, both in clinical settings and in healthy individuals. She is a contributing author to Meditation and Psychotherapy (Guilford Press). She has been practicing yoga and mindfulness meditation since 1994. Her research has been covered by numerous news outlets including The New York TimesUSA Today, CNN, and WebMD, and her work has been featured in a display at the Boston Museum of Science.

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Dr. Michael Thompson - Eight Things Parents Cannot Do For Their Children (But Wish They Could)
Oct
24
7:00 PM19:00

Dr. Michael Thompson - Eight Things Parents Cannot Do For Their Children (But Wish They Could)

RECOMMENDED FOR PARENTS, P-12: 

Research shows that today’s parents spend more time with their children, are more emotionally engaged and are committed to the success of their offspring. There is only one problem: there are actually many times when parental absence is the magic ingredient for a child’s development. In this talk, Dr. Thompson discusses the eight things you cannot do for your children and why they need experiences that can nurture their curiosity and creative powers, where they can make great friends, and where they see the path to adulthood and leadership more clearly than they can with mom and dad looking over their shoulders.

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Dr. Michael Thompson - Lunch w/Parents of 7/8th graders: The Challenge of Parenting Middle Schoolers
Oct
24
11:30 AM11:30

Dr. Michael Thompson - Lunch w/Parents of 7/8th graders: The Challenge of Parenting Middle Schoolers

  • Breck School - Heritage Room - Anderson Ice Arena (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Dr. Thompson mixes anecdote and clinical experience with research on the outcomes of different parenting styles and comes up with a warm-hearted recipe for providing children with an internal foundation for moral behavior. Early in life every child needs a “secure base;” later a child needs a “framework” around him. Only when he feels securely anchored and contained will a child be able to follow rules consistently. How can a parent provide consistency and how can he or she successfully communicate with his or her child around issues of responsibility? What do we know about the different outcomes of democratic, authoritative and authoritarian parenting? Which method of parenting produces the most competent child? Many parents have heard this talk and felt affirmed and challenged by it. Many teen-agers have heard it and have had to admit that it probably is….well…right.

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Dr. Michael Thompson - The Nature of Boys
Oct
24
8:30 AM08:30

Dr. Michael Thompson - The Nature of Boys

  • Breck School - Heritage Room - Anderson Ice Arena (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Breakfast Parent Talk: The Nature of Boys

"What’s the matter with my son?" "Why is he an underachiever in school?" "Why are boys so violent?" "Why won’t boys talk to adults?" Educators and parents in the United States are engaged in an important debate about the way we raise and educate boys. After twenty years of illuminating research on girls and debate about gender equity in schools, it is time to consider some of the risk factors that afflict the lives of boys. They are four times more likely than girls to be sent to a school psychologist; they are diagnosed with 60-80% of learning disorders. Their areas of strength, physical activity and visual-spatial perception, are not as important as verbal skills in the feminine, quiet, word-dominated environment of schools. Boys do not do as well in school as girls, from elementary school through college and they are at risk for concluding that schools don’t work for them and becoming withdrawn and bitter.

In early adolescence most boys begin to attach their sense of status to mastery and achievement. They are subjected to a powerful “culture of cruelty” which may require boys to adhere to a narrow ideology of masculinity: avoidance of feeling, avoidance of anything feminine, fear of personal weakness. The result may be a boy who is or appears closed and often angry. In this talk, Dr. Thompson gives suggestions to teachers, fathers and mothers about how to support a boy in the early years of school and how to help a boy remain emotionally open in adolescence.

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Dr. Michael Thompson- Best Friends/Worst Enemies: Friendship Development, Popularity and Social Cruelty in Childhood
Oct
23
7:00 PM19:00

Dr. Michael Thompson- Best Friends/Worst Enemies: Friendship Development, Popularity and Social Cruelty in Childhood

RECOMMENDED FOR PARENTS, P-8: 

Children don’t want adults to be involved in their social lives. They hate it when teachers "interfere." Yet teachers are witnesses to the exclusion of low-status children in elementary schools and the popularity wars of middle school and they must act to protect the weak. Parents also see the friendship difficulties of their own children. Some take their children’s social ambitions to heart and worry that their children are not popular. Other parents hope the school can protect their children from all social pain.

Social cruelty among kids is one of the most difficult things that adults have to confront in raising or educating children. Experienced teachers can be confused about how to protect a child in class, for fear of putting a rejected or controversial child in “the limelight.” They can also feel defensive when parents of neglected or victimized children come to the school for help.

This presentation walks teachers and parents through the complex social world of childhood and addresses a number of questions: What do social relationships in school predict about happiness in adult life? What is the normal sequence of child friendships, from the parallel play of the two-year-old to the intimate self-disclosure of the adolescent? Why do cliques form and what are the differences between boy and girl groups? Why are children scapegoated and how can their parents and school protect them? Dr. Thompson will draw on research to highlight the differences between friendship and popularity. He makes suggestions about the management of social problems in schools and makes the case that while all children yearn for popularity, it is friendship that helps children survive and thrive.

 

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The Naked Roommate: And 107 Other Issues You Might Run Into in College
May
17
7:00 PM19:00

The Naked Roommate: And 107 Other Issues You Might Run Into in College

Harlan is returning to Breck!

Daytime - Cargill Theater - Senior Class - The Naked Roommate: And 107 Other Issues You Might Run Into in College

Evening - Talk with PARENTS OF Juniors and Seniors - The Naked Roommate: And 107 Other Issues You Might Run Into in College

Harlan Cohen is the New York Times bestselling author of the Naked Roommate series and is one of the most widely read and respected syndicated advice columnists for teens and twenty-somethings. His column, "Help Me, Harlan!," is distributed by King Features Syndicate, and his advice has been featured in hundreds of publications, including the New York Times, Seventeen, and Psychology Today. He lives in Chicago, Illinois. For more information, visit www.HelpMeHarlan.com and www.NakedRoommate.com.

Harlan regularly tours high school and college campuses giving presentations to students, professionals and parents and he's returning to Breck this spring co-sponsored by Upper School Student Life, the Parents' Association Education Committee. and the Peter Clark Center for Mind, Brain, and Education.

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PCC Speaker Series: 5 Ways to Facilitate Learning Excellence
Feb
28
9:30 AM09:30

PCC Speaker Series: 5 Ways to Facilitate Learning Excellence

Dr. Chris Bedford, School Neuropsychologist and Director of the BrainSight Clinic in St. Paul.

Dr. Bedford joins us for a second year for hands-on workshops/discussions focused on the neuropsychological process of learning and what students and parents can do to facilitate learning excellence. 

The PCC Speaker Series is in collaboration with the Parents Association Education Committee

9:45-10:20 AM - 7th & 8th Grade Students (Chapel)

10:25-11:00 AM - 5th & 6th Grade Students (Chapel)

11:30 AM-1:00 PM - All Parents (West Board Room)

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National Center for the Development of Boys
Jan
29
8:45 AM08:45

National Center for the Development of Boys

Troy Kemp will be visiting Breck on Monday, January 29th, 2018.

In collaboration with Breck's Middle and Upper School, Athletic Department, Parents' Association, and US Mentor Program, we are delighted to welcome Troy Kemp, Executive Director of the National Center for the Development of Boys. Read Troy's story HERE.

8:45 AM - Upper School Library - What Does it Mean to be a Man Today:  Redefining Masculinity - (All parents welcome)

10:10 AM - Chapel - Upper School Student Body (All parents welcome)

11:30-12:35 - Lunch in the Glass Balcony - All Faculty Discussion: The 10 things you need to know about teaching boys

6:00-7:30 PM - Upper School Dining Hall - Presentation/Discussion with Boys of Color, their Parents, and their Coaches: Defining Yourself in a World that Tries to Define You

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PCC Speaker Series: Raising Kids in the Digital Age: Is there an app for that?
Dec
7
5:00 PM17:00

PCC Speaker Series: Raising Kids in the Digital Age: Is there an app for that?

Erin Walsh, M.A. is a dynamic, knowledgeable speaker who has addressed a wide range of audiences on topics related to brain development and raising resilient young people in the digital age. Erin was instrumental to the development of the MediaWise movement and enjoyed working with her father, Dr. David Walsh, for 10 years at the National Institute on Media and the Family before creating Mind Positive Parenting together in 2010. In addition to her work with Mind Positive Parenting, Erin is a speaker with the Bolster Collaborative and teaches undergraduate students at the Higher Education Consortium for Urban Affairs where she teaches a program called Making Media, Making Change. Erin currently serves as the board chair of YMCA Camp Widjiwagan, a wilderness-based youth development program and has consulted with schools, school districts, parent groups and other youth serving organizations throughout the country on issues related to digital media, children, youth. She lives in Minneapolis, MN with her partner, two sons, and husky dog.

The PCC Speaker Series is in collaboration with the Parents Association Education Committee

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Parents Association Education Committee Series: Brainy Parenting
Nov
30
11:30 AM11:30

Parents Association Education Committee Series: Brainy Parenting

  • Breck School - West Board Room (above the lower school library.) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

There is a lot of compelling neuroscience being reported these days and images of brain scans seem to be everywhere. The important question is -- What can help us in our parenting? What does understanding a concept like neuroplasticity, integration, variability, or hijacking do for our everyday lives as parents? Join us for a session led by Dr. Daisy Pellant, Director of the Peter Clark Center for Mind, Brain, and Education at Breck. The PCC has as its mission creating a bridge between research and practice for all students, faculty, and families. Understanding applicable research will help us develop excellence as students, teachers, and parents. As the parent of four spirited kids, aged 12-19, Daisy knows firsthand how a practical understanding of the brain has helped her parenting decisions day to day and she looks forward to opening the conversation with you.

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Parents Association Education Committee Series: How to Teach Resiliency Skills to Your Children
Oct
26
5:00 PM17:00

Parents Association Education Committee Series: How to Teach Resiliency Skills to Your Children

  • Breck School LS Library - Upper Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Katy Pearson is the Middle School Counselor at Breck School in Minneapolis, MN.  Katy has worked as a counselor/educator for over 25 years as an English teacher in American Samoa, a special education teacher in the public school system, an Outward Bound instructor, and as a wilderness trip leader for teens in the legal system. Over the years, Katy has studied the topic of Resiliency with a special focus on how to cultivate resilient traits (forgiveness, optimism and problem solving) in young people.  Katy has a compelling story to share and practical skills to impart to help support the young people in your life and to cultivate resiliency in yourself.

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The Naked Roommate: And 107 Other Issues You Might Run Into in College
May
18
7:00 PM19:00

The Naked Roommate: And 107 Other Issues You Might Run Into in College

Harlan Cohen is the New York Times bestselling author of the Naked Roommate series and is one of the most widely read and respected syndicated advice columnists for teens and twenty-somethings. His column, "Help Me, Harlan!," is distributed by King Features Syndicate, and his advice has been featured in hundreds of publications, including the New York Times, Seventeen, and Psychology Today. He lives in Chicago, Illinois. For more information, visit www.HelpMeHarlan.com and www.NakedRoommate.com.

Harlan regularly tours high school and college campuses giving presentations to students, professionals and parents and he's coming to Breck this spring co-sponsored by Upper School Student Life, the Parents' Association Education Committee. and the Peter Clark Center for Teaching and Learning Speaker Series in honor of the class of 2016. 

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Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education
Apr
7
6:30 PM18:30

Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education

CHILDCARE WILL BE PROVIDED 6:15-8:15

Glenn Whitman, Director St. Andrew's Center for Transformative Teaching & Learning and author of Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education

Breck has been invited to be an Academy School in partnership with the award-winning Center for Transformative Teaching & Learning at St. Andrew's Episcopal School in Potomac, MD. In April, 2017, Glenn Whitman will be training our Breck Faculty Fellows in the neurodevelopmental framework for Teaching All Kinds of Minds and understanding Mind, Brain, and Education applications in professional practice. We are delighted that Glenn will also be presenting his book, Neuroteach, as a part of our Peter Clark Center for Teaching & Learning Speaker Series in honor of the class of 2016. 

About Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education

Teachers are brain changers. Thus it would seem obvious that an understanding of the brain – the organ of learning – would be critical to a teacher’s readiness to work with students. Unfortunately, in traditional public, public-charter, private, parochial, and home schools across the country, most teachers lack an understanding of how the brain receives, filters, consolidates, and applies learning for both the short and long term. Neuroteach was therefore written to help solve the problem teachers and school leaders have in knowing how to bring the growing body of educational neuroscience research into the design of their schools, classrooms, and work with each individual student. It is our hope, that Neuroteach will help ensure that one day, every student –regardless of zip code or school type—will learn and develop with the guidance of a teacher who knows the research behind how his or her brain works and learns.

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Breck Faculty Fellows Training (for select faculty and administrators)
Apr
6
to Apr 8

Breck Faculty Fellows Training (for select faculty and administrators)

The Peter Clark Center for Teaching & Learning is committed to faculty development that aligns with current research on mind, brain, and education and is immediately applicable in the classroom. Select Breck faculty leaders, our Faculty Fellows, will be trained in Teaching for All Kinds of Minds and Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education. The Breck Faculty Fellows, in turn, will support the training of our entire faculty during the 2017-2018 school year. We are partnering with St. Andrew's Episcopal School and their Center for Transformative Teaching & Learning to provide faculty training and collaboratively engage in ongoing exploration into Mind, Brain, and Education Science. 

The CTTL, led by Glenn Whitman, co-author of the book Neuroteach, gathers the latest in Mind, Brain, and Education Science and works to put that research into the hands of teachers. By doing so, teachers can better construct their classes to the benefit of every student. This means more students can become high achievers and students with multiple AP classes can get their work done more efficiently.  Every student and teacher at St. Andrew's benefits from the CTTL on a daily basis.  St. Andrew’s teachers use research informed whole-class and personalized strategies to help each student become more confident, efficient, and independent learners throughout his or her learning journey. To learn more about the CTTL, visit its website by clicking here.

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Jan
31
7:00 PM19:00

Best Friends, Worst Enemies: Understanding the Social Lives of Children

PCCTL Speaker Series in Honor of the Class of 2016

Children don't want adults to be involved in their social lives. They hate it when teachers "interfere." Yet teachers are witnesses to the exclusion of low-status children in elementary schools and the popularity wars of middle school and they must act to protect the weak. Parents also see the friendship difficulties of their own children. Some take their children's social ambitions to heart and worry that their children are not popular. Other parents hope the school can protect their children from all social pain. Social cruelty among kids is one of the most difficult things that adults have to confront in raising or educating children. Experienced teachers can be confused about how to protect a child in class, for fear of putting a rejected or controversial child in "the limelight." They can also feel defensive when parents of neglected or victimized children come to the school for help. This presentation walks teachers and parents through the complex social world of childhood and addresses a number of questions: What do social relationships in school predict about happiness in adult life? What is the normal sequence of child friendships, from the parallel play of the twoyear-old to the intimate self-disclosure of the adolescent? Why do cliques form and what are the differences between boy and girl groups? Why are children scapegoated and how can their parents and school protect them? Dr. Thompson will draw on research to highlight the differences between friendship and popularity. He makes suggestions about the management of social problems in schools and makes the case that while all children yearn for popularity, it is friendship that helps children survive and thrive. 

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Jan
31
12:00 PM12:00

The Nature of Boys

  • Breck School - Anderson Ice Arena, Heritage Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Box Lunch with Michael Thompson co-sponsored by the PCCTL Speaker Series in honor of the class of 2016 and Parents' Association Education Committee.

What's the matter with my son?" Why is he an underachiever in school?" Why are boys so violent?" "Why won't boys talk to adults?" Educators and parents in the United States are engaged in an important debate about the way we raise and educate boys. After twenty years of illuminating research on girls and debate about gender equity in schools, it is time to consider some of the risk factors that afflict the lives of boys. They are four times more likely than girls to be sent to a school psychologist; they are diagnosed with 60-80% of learning disorders. Their areas of strength, physical activity and visual-spatial perception, are not as important as verbal skills in the feminine, quiet, word-dominated environment of schools. Boys do not do as well in school as girls, from elementary school through college and they are at risk for concluding that schools don't work for them and becoming withdrawn and bitter. In early adolescence most boys begin to attach their sense of status to mastery and achievement. They are subjected to a powerful "culture of cruelty" which may require boys to adhere to a narrow ideology of masculinity: avoidance of feeling, avoidance of anything feminine, fear of personal weakness. The result may be a boy who is or appears closed and often angry. In this talk, Dr. Thompson gives suggestions to teachers and parents about how to support a boy in the early years of school and how to help a boy remain emotionally open in adolescence.

Space is limited and RSVP is REQUIRED by January 20,2017 for planning the catering of box lunches. Thank you!

Name *
Name
Box Lunch: Please check all that apply: *
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Jan
31
9:00 AM09:00

The College Process: A Failed Rite of Passage

  • Breck School - Anderson Ice Arena, Heritage Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Parent Coffee with Dr. Michael Thompson, co-sponsored by the PCCTL Speaker Series in honor of the class of 2016 and Parents' Association Education Committee.

This talk is an emotional survival guide to the college admissions process. The end of high school and the transition to college confront both child and parents with numerous developmental challenges. To the extent that people think the process is just about the RIGHT college, or worse yet the ONE AND ONLY GREAT college, both parents and child are at risk for alienation from one another and disappointment in themselves. Everyone survives the college application process, more or less gracefully. Dr. Thompson gives a number of suggestions regarding how families can develop a philosophy about the process and enjoy it more. 

Space is limited and RSVP to attend this event is kindly requested by January 20, 2017 to provide for seating & coffee!

Please check one *
Name *
Name
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The Pressured Child: Helping your Child find Success in School and Life
Jan
30
7:00 PM19:00

The Pressured Child: Helping your Child find Success in School and Life

PCCTL Speaker Series in Honor of the Class of 2016

Dr. Michael Thompson Returns to Breck! 

Michael G. Thompson, Ph.D. is a consultant, author and psychologist specializing in children and families. He is the supervising psychologist for the Belmont Hill School and has worked in more than seven hundred schools across the United States, as well as in international schools in Central America, Europe, Africa and Asia.

"The Pressured Child" is, in fact, a presentation for "pressured parents" who have forgotten what school is actually like. It is a talk for parents who are gripped by worries and misapprehensions about their children's life in school. In the presentation, Dr. Thompson describes the psychological journey that children experience during their thirteen years in school. He reminds parents that children are almost never judging themselves by grades: they are always monitoring their own development and constantly searching for three things: connection, recognition and a sense of power. He illustrates how children find those in many different arenas of school life. There are three kinds of children in school: 1) those whose journeys are characterized mostly by success, 2) those whose journeys are characterized by a chronic but manageable struggle, and 3) those whose journeys are characterized by fury and despair. Each journey has its own different pressures. Every child is constantly developing strategies for coping with the pressures that he or she feels. In order to write the book, Dr. Thompson went back to school, following students, seventh graders through seniors, in independent, Catholic, and public schools. In the book and in this talk, he shares stories from the trenches, taking parents and teachers into the school day experience of children, illuminating how they manage their school careers and how the best educators and wisest parents can support them along the way. 

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Family Night - Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning
Nov
17
6:30 PM18:30

Family Night - Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning

Please join us for an evening talk with Peter C. Brown, co-author of Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning

We strongly encourage upper school students and mature middle school students to attend with their family. 

To most of us, learning something “the hard way” implies wasted time and effort. Good teaching, we believe, should be creatively tailored to the different learning styles of students and should use strategies that make learning easier. Make It Stick turns fashionable ideas like these on their head. Drawing on recent discoveries in cognitive psychology and other disciplines, the authors offer concrete techniques for becoming more productive learners.

To Learn More: http://makeitstick.net/about.php

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Oct
6
to Oct 7

Special Sessions During Conference Days

The Peter Clark Center for Teaching & Learning is hosting four sessions to share what we’ve been working on. Hear about the summer focus on mindset and metacognition, our August launch into this year’s Faculty Spark Groups, the Strategic Initiative focused on our Preschool-12 Student Support Team, and our plan for a multi-year focus on understanding learning and learners through a neurodevelpmental framework.

Presentations will be held in the Peter Clark Center for Teaching & Learning, located in room L50, between the preschool classrooms and upper school. Dates and times:

Thursday, October 6 from 11:30-12:00 or 7:00-7:30

Friday, October 7 from 10:30-11:00 or 2:30-3:00

ALSO

Drop in to learn about M_I_N_D_F_U_L_N_E_S_S and how students, faculty/staff, and parents are transforming their experience for improved teaching, learning and wellbeing. These drop-in sessions are a collaboration with our Counselors and Chaplains and will be held in the Peter Clark Center for Teaching & Learning (Room L50):

Thursday, October 6 from 2:00-2:20 or 6:00-6:20

Friday, October 7 from 10:00-10:20 or 2:00-2:20

 

 

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Sep
30
8:30 AM08:30

Fastbridge Training

Fastbridge Learning will be training members of our Student Support Team and English Department -- The University of Minnesota and Theodore J. Christ and Colleagues (TJCC) in partnership with FastBridge Learning - We are committed to helping teachers foster greater learning outcomes and aspire to provide a seamless and fully integrated solution for PreK-12 teaching, learning and assessment.

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